Benefits administrator blog from Delta Dental

Tag: communication

5 ways to encourage positive oral health habits among employees

National Employee Wellness Month is an opportunity for employers to recognize the importance of wellness in their employee’s lives. With stress and burnout on the rise, here are five ways you can encourage your employees to develop healthy oral habits.

Share discounts on popular oral care products from BrushSmart™

Help your employees upgrade their oral health routines with BrushSmart, a free oral wellness program available to all Delta Dental members. Delta Dental members who sign up receive access to special offers on popular brands and unlimited discount redemption.

Share this flyer or the website brushsmart.org with your employees.

Foster healthy habits at the office

Work takes up a major percentage of your employees’ lives. If their health and wellness is completely ignored during the workday, your employees will likely be at risk for a variety of oral and overall health issues. Habits like frequent unhealthy snacking, smoke breaks and even dehydration can contribute to poor health outcomes.

Encourage your employees to keep their wellness a priority while in the office by providing healthy snacks or even promoting smoking cessation programs. You could even create monthly competitions between departments to inspire employees to drink more water, walk further distances or even track healthy work snacks.

Send your employees our Employee Wellness Month campaign featuring tips, articles, video, recipes and more by clicking “Share” at the link.

Promote mental wellness

Did you know that oral health and mental health are deeply connected? People with mental health issues are less likely to take proper care of their oral health, and conversely, good oral health can enhance mental and overall well-being. Common mental health issues like depression, eating disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder can exacerbate poor oral health by causing people to brush and floss less frequently, miss dental visits and eat unhealthy diets.

You can help your employees by posting reminder posters about brushing and flossing in common areas, encouraging hydration through water breaks and sharing information on any mental health programs your company has on the employee intranet.

Educate employees on the importance of oral health year-round

And don’t just limit yourself to June! Throughout the year, there are weeks and months dedicated to informing the public about wellness topics like nutrition, mental health and tobacco usage. These events are the perfect opportunity for you to share information on healthy habits with your employees.

Delta Dental maintains a free, annual wellness calendar highlighting national wellness campaigns that you can use to plan wellness campaigns. Additionally, Delta Dental has shareable emails campaigns, flyers, posters and even videos to help you share oral health and wellness information with your employees.


Health and wellness are a key component to maintaining a happy and effective workforce. By prioritizing the well-being of your employees, you’re investing in the health of your entire company.

3 ways to rethink your employee benefits communication strategy

During your open enrollment period, you probably receive a flood of questions from your employees about their health benefits. But questions and confusion about benefits don’t begin and end with open enrollment. And for most companies, confusion about benefits is a major problem.

  • Only 39% of employees fully understood their company health insurance policies, according to a recent survey.
  • Nearly 20% of employees said they weren’t sure they understood the benefits they signed up for.
  • Almost half weren’t sure what their annual health coverage costs were.

The same survey found that this confusion about benefits can overwhelm employees, to the point that they often give up trying to understand them.

  • Nearly 20% of surveyed employees said they didn’t do any research before choosing their health benefits.
  • More than 90% of employees said they simply sign up for the same benefits year after year.

As a result, your employees may be spending too much to over-insure themselves, or conversely might be compromising their health by passing on important benefits to try to cut costs.

This confusion can be bad for your company’s bottom line as well, wasting available benefits and contributing to rising health care costs.

With is in mind, it might be time to rethink your benefits communication game.

Benefits communication: It’s not just for open enrollment anymore

Certainly, reaching out to employees about their benefits during open enrollment is always a good idea. But remember that your employees probably have questions and concerns about benefits throughout the year, and particularly when they have to use them. 

Look for opportunities to educate employees while benefits are on their mind.

  • At the beginning of the calendar or plan year, you can remind employees about new benefits available to them or that their new deductibles and maximums have reset
  • At the end of the calendar or plan year, you can encourage them to use their benefits before their deductibles and maximums reset
  • During the summer, you can suggest that employees with children take their kids to the dentist before they return to school
  • When employees move, or their office moves to a new area, you can offer them tips on how to find a nearby in-network dentist
  • When they experience a qualifying life event, such as getting married or having a baby, you can explain how to add a dependent to their dental plans

Help your employees help themselves

A single 20-something employee with a pet iguana is going to have very different health care needs than a married 50-year-old with a large family. What they might have in common, though, is their understanding of health care plans and their lingo — next to none.

So rather than simply mailing out printed plan guides that most employees don’t read anyway, find resources that target your employees and their unique dental plan needs to help them choose a plan that right for them.

  • For example, Delta Dental offers answers to frequently asked questions, which includes information about dental plans, such as the difference between PPO and DHMO-type plans, explanations of networks and orthodontic benefits and many other topics.
  • Delta Dental also offers helpful videos that explain Delta Dental plans, networks and more.

And be as transparent as possible with costs. If you haven’t already, share specifically how much employees will pay when they enroll in different plans.

Make benefits a two-way street

As you strive to better educate employees about their benefits, don’t miss the opportunity to have them educate you as well. Given the chance, employees might provide you with valuable information about what they want — and don’t want — in their benefits. Give employees multiple forums to provide you with feedback. A few possibilities include:

  • Q&A sessions
  • Polls
  • Surveys

The questions and comments you receive can help you tailor your benefits communication strategies by uncovering new issues, such questions about virtual dental care options.

Remember, benefits communication is about more than open enrollment. Building a strong communications strategy is important for the health of both your employees and your company. By creating effective, personalized and tech-friendly communications, you’ll potentially save money and time, and ensure that your employees get the benefits they want and need.

Delta Dental gives access to healthy smiles in many languages

Language should never be a barrier when it comes to health care. If any of your employees have limited proficiency in English, direct them to Delta Dental’s Language Assistance Program (LAP). This service is free for members and perfect for employees who communicate in languages other than English to better understand their plans or even to communicate with their dentist.

The LAP offers a variety of language accessibility services, including:

  • The Delta Dental website in Spanish offers information on Delta Dental’s different plans, as well as articles jampacked with valuable wellness information.
  • Customer service is offered in 170 different languages. Simply call 866–530-9675 and request an interpreter.
  • Delta Dental’s online dentist directory is available in both Spanish and English and includes the languages spoken by dentists and staff members. This is a great tool for helping members find a dental office where their language is spoken.
  • In-person interpretation services are also available for dental visits. If a member cannot find a dentist who speaks their language, Delta Dental can arrange to have an interpreter present during their next appointment. In addition to non-English languages, American Sign Language interpretation can also be requested. All the member needs to do is contact Customer Service at least 72 hours in advance and make the request.
  • Document translation to any non-English language can be requested for any written materials, such as benefits information. Accessible formats like braille and audio files can also be requested.

If any of your employees are having trouble communicating with their dentist, call Delta Dental to arrange for a qualified interpreter to help via phone. 

Delta Dental telephone numbers for interpretive services: 

  • State Government Programs: 877–580-1042 
  • Delta Dental Premier®/Delta Dental PPO™: 888–335-8227 
  • DeltaCare® USA: 800–422-4234 
  • DeltaVision®: 888–963-6576 
  • TTY 711 

Kids’ unmet oral health needs highlighted by the pandemic

When your employees become parents, they receive an onslaught of information about their child’s growth markers and health checkups from immunizations to well-child visits. When it comes to dental care, however, less than half of parents receive professional advice on when to start taking their child to the dentist.

And lack of guidance is only the beginning of the problem. Access to dental care has been an ongoing challenge for U.S. children, but during the pandemic, dental care emerged as children’s greatest unmet health need, according to a recent study published in JADA.

What does this mean for your employees and their children, and what can you do to support them?

The pandemic’s effect on pediatric oral health

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, dental disease among children was rampant:

The pandemic made these problems worse by stressing the financial systems that delivers dental care with income and job losses. Households were three times more likely to identify dental care as an unmet health need as a result of the pandemic compared to medical care, according to a JADA study. The authors found a significant association between the probability of unmet child dental care and pandemic-related household income or job loss.

About 40% of families reported the loss of a job or decrease in income due to the pandemic. Before the pandemic, children from families with lower income or who were on Medicaid were twice as likely to have cavities than children from higher-income households. Whether due to lost or decreased income, fear of contracting COVID-19 and mixed communication from health organizations, dental care visits dropped in 2020.

Many people were able to stay covered for medical procedures due to robust signups for Medicare and Medicaid pandemic. But cost remains the major barrier to receiving dental care, since Medicare and Medicaid packages rarely cover many dental procedures. Although access to pediatric dental care has grown for families with public insurance since the early 2000s, kids in low-income families are still less likely to visit the dentist regularly. Additional barriers include difficulty finding a willing dentist, transportation and geographic proximity to dental providers.

Potential solutions for children’s unmet oral health needs

As a benefit administrator, you can invest time into communication efforts that may bridge knowledge gaps among your employees. Here are a couple of ways you can get started:

  • Talk about timelines. Inform your employees about recommended timelines for pediatric care to guarantee they get the information they need, whether or not their dentists communicate that information.
  • Design your package. When you’re designing your benefits package, cover important preventive services for kids, like sealants and fluoride treatments.
  • Highlight plan features. Encourage employees to take advantage of aspects of their insurance, like teledentistry coverage, that can make pediatric care easier. Did you know that 75% of pediatric dentists offer virtual services, compared to only a third of general dentists?
  • Share materials. Explore Delta Dental’s wellness resources and share a selection of helpful articles and flyers in an email or on an internal site. You can even highlight assets that are made for kids, like MySmileKids and Grin! for Kids.
  • Be consistent. When communicating helpful information to your employees, using multiple channels can be confusing and difficult to keep track of. Find a simple routine for sharing, like posting information on an internal webpage with monthly or quarterly email notifications, so that your employees always know where to look.

How Delta Dental invests in communities

To help dentists make investments in their communities, the Delta Dental Community Care Foundation awards several million dollars in grants each year to increase access to care. These awards enable underserved individuals, including children, to get preventive and restorative treatments in accessible locations. More than 250 organizations received funding from the Delta Dental Community Care Foundation during the COVID-19 pandemic, totaling $11 million to provide relief. Many of these clinics support and serve children.

These Access to Care grants fund activities designed to remove barriers to seeking care such as distance, cost, and even fear. The grants can be used to set up mobile or pop-up clinics in a local community, provide dental care in underserved clinical settings, fund outreach programs or offset costs for clinics that routinely provide care to underserved populations.

What comes next

There will probably be some relief for underserved communities, including children, soon. The U.S. economy seems to be recovering. The national unemployment rate is projected to fall to 5.3% by the end of the year.

But the problems highlighted by the pandemic shouldn’t be ignored. As a benefits administrator, you can’t be expected to fix all of the problems in the American economy or health care industry. Still, by highlighting resources and keeping your employees informed, you can positively affect the employees you work with and their children.

Remote work and employers: what are the pros and cons?

In 2020, we all learned just how fast the world could adapt to new measures. In the workforce, this has meant relying on coworkers and employees to bring their work home without missing a beat. With a year passed since COVID-19 changed the world, it’s time to reflect on the first year as full-time remote employers, what has been learned from it, and how to continue to adapt moving forward.

Here’s a closer look at the pros and cons of remote working:

Pros

Flexibility

Working from home is far from a new concept. In fact, it’s often touted as a job perk by hiring managers. For employees, it often comes down to flexibility. Working remotely can be an opportunity schedule quick errands, focus in a less distracting environment or even to enjoy more time with the pets while still accomplishing the tasks at hand. The freedoms of remote work can be a major morale-booster. A study by PwC recently found that 55% of would like still to keep working from home at least three days a week once it’s safe to return to the office.

Lack of commute

Who wouldn’t choose walking to their living room over an hour commute on an over-stuffed train? Eliminating this often stressful part of the day saves time, money and headaches. It also takes more cars off the road, meaning less air pollution. In November, NASA announced that global nitrogen dioxide concentrations had been reduced by nearly 20% since February of 2020.

Larger pool of candidates

Eliminating a tough commute can also mean a more competitive job market. When people can work from anywhere, it widens the pool of potential candidates. For permanently remote jobs where location isn’t a requirement, employers can reap the benefits with a larger number of viable applicants.

Saved money

Less people in an office means a smaller office space, fewer everyday office expenses like supplies and cleanup, and less utilities at work. These kinds of savings aren’t just beneficial during uncertain times — they can be lucrative to new businesses trying to grow.

Cons

Blurred work/life balance

One of the more complicated issues to arise from remote working has been the stress of balancing a regular workday with our rapidly changing world. When the physical barrier of an office is removed, the lines between professional and personal lives can get a bit fuzzy. While flexible work hours may be a pro, they can become a slippery slope of overtime and burnout if left unchecked. In fact a recent Gallup poll showed that 29% of people who always work from home feel burnt out “very often” or “always.”

Encourage your staff to set up a corner of their home just for work if they can and to stay online for office hours only. Check in regularly to make sure that they feel heard and supported in their work endeavors.

Internet complications

We’ve all heard the horror stories: Someone forgot to mute themselves in a meeting or couldn’t figure out how to turn a Zoom filter off. In 2020, the learning curve got a bit steeper as our toolboxes grew along with our reliance on technology.

A little bit of training and empathy can go a long way in these cases. As expectations change, offer learning guides, webinars and other resources to help employees with the learning process. Additionally, understand that complications can occasionally arise when employees are at the mercy of Wi-Fi, laptops, and other far-from-perfect technologies.

Less organic opportunities for connection

With no watercooler to gather around, those little day-to-day opportunities for staff to connect can be tougher to find. Don’t let it wedge a gap between the team.

Schedule a little time for virtual team-building opportunities, be it a lunch meet-up or a Friday game hour. Take this time to focus on company values and consider how you can foster trust and communication.

As the world continues to change, take some time to reflect on how much you and your team have already adapted and give yourself credit where it’s due. Creating a culture of openness and empathy will help address issues as they arise and keep you connected to your team.

How to communicate dental benefits virtually

Communicating with employees in a period of social distancing requires new approaches, and you can manage open enrollment with a solid plan. Since in-person meetings may not be feasible during the COVID-19 pandemic, take advantage of technology to make virtual presentations that are timely and effective.

You can start by planning a virtual benefits fair. This may include medical and dental plan options or you can expand it to a general wellness event. Keeping in mind the value of an in-person session, give your employees handouts or videos that they can view online. The fair can provide information on dental plan coverage and premiums, along with instructions for enrollment for new employees and options for making changes for current enrollees.

Scheduling a video conference meeting with employees is an effective way to connect in real time to explain plan options, answer questions and provide resources. Recording the live session gives employees the opportunity to view information at their convenience.

You can also make recorded sessions or videos available via mobile app so employees can access them on their smartphones.

Throughout open enrollment, you can stay in touch through a blog, FAQ page and opportunities for employees to have online chats with benefits administrators. Rest assured, your benefits plan communications can be effectively delivered virtually, with the added value of safety.

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